David Homel

Literary

Contact Info

Email address
Resides in
English Montreal

Experience working with

  • Cycle 2 Elementary
  • Cycle 3 Elementary
  • Secondary 1 & 2
  • Secondary 3 & 4
  • Secondary 5
  • CEGEP

I regularly explore the following Broad Areas of Learning/Themes in my work

  • Personal and Career Planning
  • Media Literacy
  • Citizenship and Community Life (Identity & Belonging)

Listed in the Quebec Culture in the Schools Repertoire

  • Yes

I have experience working with

  • Carrefour Emploi-Jeunesse, NDG. Auteurs en herbe, French Ontario schools, several locations. A variety of elementary schools, English and French, throughout Quebec.

I can facilitate virtual creative experiences

  • No

School board areas you are available to work in

  • Central Quebec - Quebec City & Environs
  • Eastern Townships
  • English Montreal
  • Lester B Pearson - outside Montreal transportation areas (STM)
  • Lester B Pearson - within public transit area
  • Western Quebec - Southern area (Hull, Wakefield etc)
  • New Frontiers - Chateauguay
  • New Frontiers - Chateauguay Valley
  • Sir Wilfrid Laurier – Lanaudiere
  • Sir Wilfrid Laurier – Laurentian
  • Sir Wilfrid Laurier – Laval

Travel

  • I am available for travel within the same day
  • I am available for travel overnight
  • An extended residency is an option
From an immigrant family whose grandparents were illiterate, I now work full-time as a writer in a number of fields: fiction-writing for young readers and adults, journalism, documentary film, translation... I've visited schools in Canada, the US, Mexico, Cuba, the Balkans and several west European countries. And every time, I learn something new from the students.

Creative Approach and Experiences Offered

I always like to start with one question: where do the good stories come from? In our houses, and if so, where? In the garage, the basement? In the neighborhood? With our families? And what's a good story anyway? I know the answer: the one we absolutely have to tell, the one that matters to us most. Not easy finding that one... So how do we look for it? We don't only look around, we look inward -- both at the same time. Once we get our hands on something promising, we start building the narrative, and we start asking the literary questions: who will tell the story? What point of view? Where will it happen and how will we interest our readers? I bring examples from my work and that of others to show how it's done. For example, the first scene of my first book came to me as a result of a nuclear bomb drill when I was 10 years old, during the Cuban missile crisis. Now, that's a good start! The students learn how to build a good starting scene. and something about world history too.
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